Hi I talk & write about gender absurdities in media, politics, religion and pop culture, because I've pretty much had as much misogyny as I can take without my head flat out exploding from the idiocy. Still, whenever possible, I would really rather laugh than cry while thinking about it.

There’s a double standard in terms of the kinds of things men can say in PG-13 movies. You put those same words in the mouths of women and it became far more terrifying. As soon as we articulated this and brought up examples, it was incredibly gratifying to see the MPAA came to the same conclusion.
- Emma Watts (President of Production, 20th Century Fox) on getting The Other Woman's initial R rating reduced to PG-13 without making any cuts (via popchange)

thekingofwinter:

takohai:

glitteringknight:

"Your highness" is gender neutral.

So you know, if you’re ever confused about my pronouns.

That’ll work.

alternatively, “your majesty,” “my liege,” and “supreme overlord”

please note that “your grace” is also acceptable

"My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

But here is what I think you should know.

You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.”

- Libby Anne (via coachk13)
And now for an exercise in absurdity: a nurse who refuses to prescribe contraception is suing a family planning clinic because it refused to hire her. It refused to hire her for a very simple reason, which probably seems obvious: It’s a family planning clinic, and she refused to perform family planning services. Rather than take that as a fairly reasonable basis for rejection, and conclude that perhaps she would be happier and of more use in a different context (a crisis pregnancy center, perhaps), the nurse decided to sue the clinic, claiming that it discriminated against her on the basis of her religion.
socimages:

Happy birthday, Sociological Images!
We’re 7 years old today!  To celebrate, we found a picture of seven capybaras.
Thanks to everyone who has visited over the last seven years!  This is our 5,226th post and I can hardly believe it.  Ready to charge on for another!
Here are some highlights from the last year. The blog never ceases to surprise!
Volunteers put together two new Course Guides: Sociology of Work and Occupations and Family and Society.
We put together three new Pinterest pages: Racist Antics at Colleges and High Schools,  the Mean Girls Meme, and Marketing Feminism.
Celebrity tweets! Musician Amanda Palmer and Piper Kerman, of Orange is the New Black fame, tweeted about us!
We received an award from MERLOT for being an “outstanding” sociology resource.
Charlotte’s letter to Lego went viral.
Our contributor, sociologist Philip Cohen, had a new textbook come out, titled: The Family: Diversity, Inequality, and Social Change.
We began seeing SocImages material re-posted at Business Insider.
Our most liked post of the year: From the Mouths of Rapists: The Lyrics of Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines, by Sezin Koehler, received 186,000 likes and counting.
My Salon article on men’s difficulty forming friendships with other men hit a nerve.
The Society Pages podcast interviewed me about what it’s like nurturing this site to life every day.
Our 8-month-old Tumblr reached 17,000+ followers and we can now boast 57,000 Facebook, 20,000 Twitter, and 12,000 Pinterest followers.  Y’all are the best!

socimages:

Happy birthday, Sociological Images!

We’re 7 years old today!  To celebrate, we found a picture of seven capybaras.

Thanks to everyone who has visited over the last seven years!  This is our 5,226th post and I can hardly believe it.  Ready to charge on for another!

Here are some highlights from the last year. The blog never ceases to surprise!

olsennnnn:

So I was talking to my friend about colouring books and she showed me this one.

image

And then there was this page.

image

And finally this absolute gem!

image

How amazing is this book?! I want one.

halftheskymovement:

A new report by British writer/producer Stephen Follows has revealed damning statistics about gender equality in the film industry. The report, entitled “Gender in Film Crews,” analyzed data from 2,000 blockbuster films since 1994 to look at the distribution of roles in film crews between men and women.

According to the report, just 22.6% of all film crew positions are held by women. Women only make up the majority of positions in traditionally female departments such as costume and make-up. Furthermore, women are severely underrepresented in key creative roles: for example, women make up only 5% of all directors on blockbuster films since 1994.

"It’s terrifying. Every time I did a small bit of research I couldn’t believe how unrepresentative the industry was," Follows told The Guardian. “Honestly, when I first saw quite how big the divide was, how overwhelming it was, I went back and did my research again just to double check.”

One of the hardest-hit schools was Mitchell Middle School, according to Gabrielle Sharrock, who has worked as a library media specialist in the district for five years and will start as the school’s librarian next academic year.

She said she was not consulted about books being removed and she visited the library two days after the school was “weeded” and found dozens of boxes full of books slated to be destroyed, numerous shelves bare and most of the non-fiction section nearly cleared out.

“It was just devastating to see that,” she said. “If I had to replace all of those books with my budget it would take 16 years, and by then they would be outdated.”