Hi I talk & write about gender absurdities in media, politics, religion and pop culture, because I've pretty much had as much misogyny as I can take without my head flat out exploding from the idiocy. Still, whenever possible, I would really rather laugh than cry while thinking about it.

When I was 12 boys slid their hand up my thigh and slapped my butt. I smiled and took it because I didn’t know it was okay to say stop. I didn’t know that I could say no. So, when the principal calls telling me my daughter is suspended for punching a boy who wouldn’t stop touching her, I will cook her favorite meals. When she tells me how she cursed at the boy who wouldn’t move his hands off her knee even though she asked him to, I will smile and pull out her favorite movie to watch together. I will celebrate the fact that she accepts her body as her own and knows she has the right to say no. I never want my daughter to think her body belongs to men, because it is her own and my god should she be proud. I will teach her it’s more than okay to say stop, something I wish I had known when I was that age.
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don’t be soft, let the world know you exist // 5-26-14 // 9:01AM (via restrictedthoughts)

OH MY GOD FUCKIN YES PREAAAACH THIS IS SO FUCKIN RIGHT

(via isvla)

swamphorcydes:

things you can mad at instead of the ~*obesity epidemic*~

  • the poverty epidemic
  • the unemployment epidemic
  • the racism epidemic
  • the white man epidemic
  • the transmisogyny epidemic
  • the u.s. drone epidemic
  • the expensive education epidemic
  • the rapist epidemic
  • the colonialist epidemic
  • the victim blaming epidemic
  • the bootstraps epidemic
  • the condescending yuppie epidemic
It’s an existential dilemma to be alive and realize you are not important and that your body, the one you believe belongs to YOU, in fact may not. It may belong to your father, your mother, your boyfriend, your girlfriend, a stranger, your state. It makes some people angry. But good girls don’t get angry, do they? It’s so unattractive. But depression, that’s a different thing.

“The beauty of a living thing is not the atoms that go into it, but the way those atoms are put together.” - Carl Sagan, Cosmos

apsies:

King said in an interview that this photograph was taken as he tried to explain to his daughter Yolanda why she could not go to Funtown, a whites-only amusement park in Atlanta. King claims to have been tongue-tied when speaking to her. “One of the most painful experiences I have ever faced was to see her tears when I told her Funtown was closed to colored children, for I realized the first dark cloud of inferiority had floated into her little mental sky.”
apsies:

King said in an interview that this photograph was taken as he tried to explain to his daughter Yolanda why she could not go to Funtown, a whites-only amusement park in Atlanta. King claims to have been tongue-tied when speaking to her. “One of the most painful experiences I have ever faced was to see her tears when I told her Funtown was closed to colored children, for I realized the first dark cloud of inferiority had floated into her little mental sky.”

apsies:

King said in an interview that this photograph was taken as he tried to explain to his daughter Yolanda why she could not go to Funtown, a whites-only amusement park in Atlanta. King claims to have been tongue-tied when speaking to her. “One of the most painful experiences I have ever faced was to see her tears when I told her Funtown was closed to colored children, for I realized the first dark cloud of inferiority had floated into her little mental sky.”

"It’s not a problem. We change her into a girl again." Really, read Jenny Nordberg’s Underground Girls of Kabul. Very little was known about this practice until she began investigating it.


One of my favorite things I ever came across at the MET museum. Julia Margaret Cameron (1815-1879) is, arguably, one of the greatest portraitists in the history of photography. This photo is called The Parting of Guinivere and Lancelot, 1874.

One of my favorite things I ever came across at the MET museum. Julia Margaret Cameron (1815-1879) is, arguably, one of the greatest portraitists in the history of photography. This photo is called The Parting of Guinivere and Lancelot, 1874.

One of my favorite things I ever came across at the MET museum. Julia Margaret Cameron (1815-1879) is, arguably, one of the greatest portraitists in the history of photography. This photo is called The Parting of Guinivere and Lancelot, 1874.

America was built on two monumental crimes: the genocide of the Native American and the enslavement of the African American. The tendency of official America is to memorialize other peoples’ crimes and to forget its own - to seek a high moral ground as a pretext to ignore real issues.
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Mahmood Mamdani

I have never seen such perfect sentences.

(via yamesmooma)